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SUMMER IN BERLIN
A big hit in its native Germany, Summer in Berlin is the tale of two working class women living in the German capital. Nike (Nadja Uhl) is a single mother who works as a nurse in a retirement home but dreams of being a window designer, whose relationship with her best friend Katrin (Inka Friedrich) becomes strained when she embarks on an ill-advised love affair with a trucker. The theme of single women and their romantic and financial struggles is hardly new, but director Andreas Dresen handles what could have been dark and dreary material with humor and a pleasing lightness of touch, ably blending dramatic and comic moments, and is helped by strong performances from Uhl and Friedrich, two of the best German actresses around. Summer in Berlin opens in New York March 30, at Landmark Sunshine Cinema, April 20 in Los Angeles at Laemmle's Music Hall; May 11 in Austin, TX at Landmark's Dobie Theater, Washington, DC at Landmark's E Street Cinema and Boston, MA at Landmark's Kendall Square Cinema. Filmmaker and D Street Releasing would like to thank Volkswagen AG, V2 Vodka, Fernet-Branca, and Karlsberg Beer for their support of the film.

AFTER THE WEDDING
Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards last month, After the Wedding represents the breakthrough movie for Susanne Bier, one of a crop of Danish directors making exciting, innovative cinema at the moment. Jacob (Casino Royale villain Mads Mikkelsen), a solitary Dane running an ailing orphanage in Mumbai, returns to his native Copenhagen after 20 years abroad in the hope of getting rich philanthropist Jorgen (Rolf Lassgard) to help out the Indian street children he cares for. Far from being just a business trip, Jacob's homecoming forces him to confront his past after an unexpected revelation. The script by Bier and her regular screenwriter Anders Thomas Jensen cleverly plays with genre conventions, while controlled direction and fine performances make this a dark, complex and satisfying drama.

OUTLANDISH EMPIRE
To save yourself the expense of a trip to gay Paris to see David Lynch's bizarre and haunting exhibition at the Fondation Cartier, The Air is on Fire, you can instead take a virtual tour here. Go to the English language version of the site, select The Air is on Fire from the 'What's On' menu, then go to 'Views of the Exhibition' and 'The Works.' (And for those of you who want to see it in person, the show runs until May 27.)

 
     
 

KEEPING IT SIMPLE
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DON'T JUDGE THE MOVIE BY ITS POSTER!
After earning the ire of both the MPAA and alarmed motorists with its unapproved billboard campaign for the upcoming Elisha Cuthbert torture pic Captivity, After Dark Releasing is preparing to court further controversy with its campaign for Wristcutters, a very good film that deals, in part, with suicide...

Read the complete stories at Filmmakermagazine's Blog...

   

THE DIRECTOR INTERVIEW: BRIAN COOK - By Nick Dawson
Color Me Kubrick: A True...ish Story is the fascinating story of English conman Alan Conway (flamboyantly portrayed by John Malkovich) who made his career out of impersonating Stanley Kubrick. Conway found out that hardly anyone actually knew what Kubrick looked like, a discovery which led him to take his deception to extravagant, and often ridiculous, extremes. He used his borrowed identity to obtain huge amounts of money and seduce the young and impressionable, and got so immersed in the activities of his affluent alter ego that he began almost believing he was Kubrick....

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