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      EDITOR'S NOTE
Unless you are, perhaps, a traditional animator, or an experimental film or video maker and can work entirely alone, filmmaking is by nature a collaborative art form. The visions in a filmmaker's head are mediated by not just circumstance but the input of collaborators ranging from funders to crew members. It's been that way since the early days of cinema, so what's different now that filmmakers have a whole new array of tools that enable collaborative processes? Does collaborating with your d.p. by Skype produce the same result as meeting in person? How about soliciting edit notes from your online community as opposed to your group of friends? If collaboration is to be embraced, what power, if any, should a director give up in its name? When push comes to shove, can collaborative practices advance a film through its final hurdles of fine cut, picture lock, delivery and distribution strategy, or are more dictatorial approaches needed?

These are all the questions I had in my head after moderating a panel at DIY Days in Philadelphia on collaboration. Midway through the panel I realized that we probably should have spent our time discussing not how we are collaborating but the definition of collaboration itself. For some, I realized, collaboration is a way to crowdsource and streamline the production process. For others, it's a way to create content that wouldn't otherwise have been created. And for others it's a way to create alternatives to old-school distribution methods. I'm thinking about all of this for a blog post and, as always I'm interested in what you have to say. You can e-mail me at editor.filmmakermazine AT gmail.com.

On other notes, remember to follow us on Twitter and to visit our new Filmmaker Forums and take part in the discussions are beginning to develop. Hope to see you there.

See you next week.

Best,

Scott Macaulay
Editor
      NEW IN THEATERS
COLD SOULS
Cold Souls stars actor Paul Giamatti as actor Paul Giamatti. Feeling anxious when preparing to star in a new production of Uncle Vanya, Paul hears of an organization that temporarily removes peoples' souls to rid them of their inner problems. Paul goes for it, but finds himself completely empty and numb afterwards. When he tries to get his soul back it's a much more complicated situation than expected, as it's been trafficked to Russia where it's been implanted by a soap-opera actress. Written and directed by Sophie Barthes (her feature directing debut), and co-starring David Straithairn and Emily Watson, Cold Souls follows in the tradition of mind bending metaphysical comedies like Sleeper and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind as it finds both humor and human drama in an unlikely dramatization of Cartesian dualism. Subscribe to our digital issue to read filmmaker Astra Taylor's interview with Barthes as well as access to our back issues up until 2005.

BEESWAX
A new film from writer-director Andrew Bujalski (Mutual Appreciation, Funny Ha Ha), Beeswax centers on the relationship between twin sisters Jeannie and Lauren (Tilly Hatcher and Maggie Hatcher, each making their film debut) living in Austin, TX, where Jeannie has been running a vintage clothing store with her sorta-friend Amanda (Anne Dodge) for the past few years. The film begins as Amanda, whose lawyer father drew up the business contract, announces that she's severing ties with the store, and there are vague intimations that a lawsuit may follow. Jeannie turns to ex-boyfriend Merrill (Alex Karpovsky), a law student, for legal advice and moral support in a film that is a low-key ode to the complexities of modern relationships One of the trailblazers of the mumblecore movement, Nick Dawson asks Bujalski in this week's Director Interviews if the genre has helped or hindered his filmmaking. "I actually have no idea," says Bujalski. "The fact that mumblecore has been hotly debated on the internet may or may not have anything to do with anybody coming to see the films. I don't think it hurts – in terms of the concept that there's no such thing as bad publicity – but it certainly has nothing to do with what I was trying to do as a filmmaker and a storyteller." Read our interview with Bujalski below.

      RECENT BLOGS

This week on the blog, Jason Guerrasio finds the company Paul visits to store his soul in Cold Souls (pictured left), reports on IndieGoGo and SnagFilms joining forces to help doc filmmakers and Scott Macaulay links to Sabi Pictures' post on our message boards about indie test screenings.

To read more posts from our blog, click here.

      UPCOMING AT IFP
IFP INDEPENDENT FILMMAKER CONFERENCE - SEPT. 19-23, 2009 - NYC
IFP's five-day Independent Filmmaker Conference is the must-attend event for film and media professionals to learn how today's creative choices and business decisions are impacting tomorrow's artists, industry and audiences - and shaping the future of independent film and media-making. Taking place during Independent Film Week (September 19-24, 2009), the Conference will include advice from pioneering independent filmmakers and insights from industry leaders such as from Big Beach Films, BMI, B-Side, Focus Features, HBO, SAGIndie, Sundance, SXSW, and more! Panelists and Keynotes to be announced soon! PASSES ON SALE NOW .

Download the Conference Brochure and purchase passes at www.filmmakerconference.com.

      NEWEST WEB ARTICLE
ANDREW BUJALSKI, BEESWAX
By Nick Dawson

Andrew Bujalski's third feature, Beeswax feels somewhat distinct from his previous films, not least because Mutual Appreciation was shot way back in 2003. Moreover, Beeswax is about a more grown-up world than Bujalski has shown us before, depicting the lives of a pair of twins, wheelchair-bound Jeannie (Tilly Hatcher) and her sister Lauren (Maggie Hatcher). Both are in flux, as Jeannie's business partner in her vintage clothing store is (maybe) threatening to sue her, which prompts Jeannie to reestablish ties with her law grad ex Merrill (Alex Karpovsky), and Lauren is between jobs and weighing whether she should accept a position in Kenya. The film's main preoccupations are family (sometimes in a broader sense) and communication, and the intersection of the two. read more

      FESTIVAL DEADLINES

AUGUST
Sundance Film Festival
Submission Deadline: Aug. 17 (early), Sept. 25 (final)
Festival Dates: Jan. 21-31

Slamdance Film Festival
Submission Deadline: Aug. 21 (early), Oct. 30 (final)
Festival Dates: Jan 21-28

      JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Our Forums page is new and improved! Check out the new categories: how to make films, discuss the current trends in the business, job opportunities and look out for guest filmmaker moderators. Click here to get started.

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