EDITOR'S NOTE
Our next issue went to the press on Tuesday, so expect to see it in your mailboxes and on newsstands in the next three weeks or so. Last week in the newsletter I gave a quick rundown of what's in it, but one piece I didn't mention is Michael Tully's interview with 25 New Faces director Jessica Oreck about her Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo. All of us at Filmmaker love the movie, and we've given it feature editorial space. Jessica is still raising funds through Kickstarter for its distribution and her deadline is fast approaching. Don't let our editorial space go to waste! If you are so inclined, check out her Kickstarter page here. If you read the blog you will have noticed that I promised an iPad review this week. Look for it by the end of the weekend or Monday at the latest. One thing that I had hoped to fold into the review was some commentary on how publications are designing for it, but there isn't much out there yet. I'd like to do an iPad version of Filmmaker. If you're not already sick of iPad media coverage, check out this blog post and the video of three magazines on the iPad and post a comment about what you'd like to see in a Filmmaker edition.

See you next week.

Best,

Scott Macaulay
Editor

      NEW IN THEATERS
AFTER.LIFE
What if when you died, your soul still lived on, in limbo between Earth and the other side? One of Filmmaker Magazine's "25 New Faces," Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo explores this subject in her film After.Life, throwing some psychological horror into the mix along the way. Anna (Christina Ricci) dies in a car accident, but wakes up in the funeral home, tended to by Eliot (Liam Neeson). He assures her that she is dead, and he is there to help her transition to the other side. But his strict control over her raises suspicion that she might not really be dead, and it's up to both her and her grief-ridden boyfriend (Justin Long) to save her. It's a creepy and unnerving film that questions if there is an afterlife, and the acceptance of death.

IT CAME FROM KUCHAR
Jennifer Kroot's It Came from Kuchar focuses on underground filmmaking twin brothers George and Mike Kuchar. Making films since they were boys in 1950s Bronx, their outlandish and bizarre filmmaking style made them the darlings of the New York underground film scene of the 1960s, who dubbed them the "8mm Mozarts." They made many campy, low-budget films with titles like The Naked and the Nude, Lust for Ecstasy and The Devil's Cleavage, which influenced many filmmakers, including Todd Haynes, John Waters, and Atom Egoyan. It Came from Kuchar centers on George as a teacher of film production at the San Francisco Art Institute, and the enthusiasm in which his students take with staging their own class production. Kroot, who was a student in George's class, talks about what she learned about the brothers in making the film. "I got much more exposed to their films after I started making this project," she says. "I had seen many of their films before obviously, but since they've made so many films, George himself has made over 500 films, it can be really hard to make a dent in that. So in making the film I was able to really look into different periods of his work and Mike's as well." Read our interview with Kroot below.

WHEN YOU'RE STRANGE: A FILM ABOUT THE DOORS
Narrated by Johnny Depp, When You're Strange is a new and insightful documentary about the legendary rock band, The Doors. Tom DiCillo (Living in Oblivion, Box of Moonlight) wraps new and unseen footage of The Doors shot by Paul Ferrara, an old UCLA Film School pal of Morrison's. These personal moments gives the film a more honest portrayal of the group than previously seen. When You're Strange is primarily for Doors fans, and it's a real treat to get to see something new and hopefully discover some intriguing insights into the band's character.

LA MISSION
Directed by San Francisco native Peter Bratt (Follow Me Home), La Mission is an intense and raw family drama about patriarchal roles and stereotypes in a tough neighborhood, and how those social mores can break a family apart. Che Rivera (Benjamin Bratt), a reformed ex-inmate and former alcoholic, runs the streets of the Mission District with a mix of charm, street smarts, and a short fuse. He holds his hard knocks close to him, and won't accept anything less. When he finds out his son Jesse (Jeremy Ray Valdez) is gay, he beats him and disowns him in a fit of pure machismo. His narrow view of himself and the world leaves him isolated and alone, and now he has to get over his preconceived notions of himself and get back the one true love he had in his life, his son. An inspired family production -- Benjamin and Peter are brothers, and Talisa Soto (Benjamin's wife) is also in the cast -- La Mission is shot with a gritty lens by D.P. Hiro Narita that captures the essence of a tough but rich neighborhood in the heart of San Francisco.

      RECENT BLOGS

This week on the blog, Scott Macaulay looks at the possibilities of making an iPad (pictured left) version of the magazine; The Big Lebowski is given the porn parody treatment, and the Producer's Guild of America just added a category for the "transmedia producer."

To read more posts from our blog, click here.

      UPCOMING AT IFP
INDEPENDENT FILM WEEK'S PROJECT FORUM OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS
Independent Film Week (September 19-24) is the oldest and largest forum in the U.S. for the discovery of new projects in development and new voices on the independent film scene. The Project Forum is a meetings-driven forum connecting filmmakers who have new narrative and documentary projects with key industry executives interested in identifying projects with which to become involved at the financing or distribution stage. It is the best opportunity for independent filmmakers to connect with industry professionals - including producers, funders, distributors, broadcasters, sales agents and festival programmers. The Project Forum also furthers filmmaker and industry interaction with opportunities for networking at social events throughout the week. Now accepting applications for all three sections: Emerging Narrative (for U.S. writers and writer/directors seeking producers and agents to develop, produce, represent and finance their scripts), No Borders (for U.S. and International producers with partial financing on new narrative projects seeking additional partners), and Spotlight on Documentaries (for U.S. filmmakers in production or post-production seeking financing partners, broadcast/distribution opportunities, and festival invitations.) Deadlines (early/final) vary by section: Emerging Narrative (April 23) No Borders (April 30/May 21), Spotlight on Documentaries (May 7/May 21). Full criteria and applications here.

      NEWEST WEB ARTICLE
JENNIFER KROOT, IT CAME FROM KUCHAR
By Brandon Harris

George and Mike Kuchar are two of the great camp experimental filmmakers of all time. They represented a pastiche heavy, less self-serious strand of the New American Cinema's downtown explosion in the early 1960s. Evangelized by Jonas Mekas in the pages of The Village Voice, their work spans over 700 short and feature films, almost all of the executed on the flimsiest of budgets, many of them made in an almost artisanal, fiercely individualistic mode. read more

      FESTIVAL DEADLINES

APRIL
Los Angeles International Film Festival
Next Deadline: April 12. Late Deadline: June 7
Festival Dates: July 2

Indianapolis International Film Festival
Next Deadline: April 15. Final Deadline: May 7
Festival Dates: July 15-25

Bronx Independent Film Festival
Next Deadline: April 16. Final Deadline: May 1
Festival Dates: June 17-19

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