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We asked Sundance directors five questions about their films
SIMON KILLER DIRECTOR ANTONIO CAMPOS By Alexandra Byer

Indie sweetheart Antonio Campos debuted his newest feature film, Simon Killer, yesterday at Sundance. After he and his partners made waves in Park City last year with Martha Marcy May Marlene (which won Sean Durkin the Best Director award, and introduced Lizzy Olsen to the world), critics and audiences have placed Borderline's newest on their must-see list. But that hasn't changed things for Campos. He comes to Park City as a director this year, prepared to experience the festival from a new perspective. Read the Interview

SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED DIRECTOR COLIN TREVORROW By Dan Schoenbrun

Safety Not Guaranteed might be the first feature film based on an internet meme. In 2005, a newspaper classified ad from 1997 started to spread across the web, depicted a mulleted man who claimed to be seeking, "Somebody to go back in time with me." The ad, which also specified, "this is not a joke" was eventually revealed to be exactly that, a fake listing published to fill out space in the paper. But that hasn't stopped director Colin Trevorrow from crafting his first feature film around it. Read the Interview

We posed the question, "Why are you a filmmaker?"
YOUNG AND WILD WRITER-DIRECTOR MARIALY RIVAS I didn't have an option, when I was 7 years old I felt "the calling", I knew since then what I wanted to do with my life: become a filmmaker. Since then, it has been pretty much like being passionately in love with somebody, why do we fall in love with some particular person and not the next? It doesn't really have a rational explanation -at least not for me- you are just in love. During the years, I have tried to give it a sense, so here goes my best effort. In retrospective I think it has a lot to do mostly with two things:Read more

ME @ THE ZOO DIRECTORS CHRIS MOUKARBEL & VALERIE VEATCH Our film Me @ The Zoo began in another form entirely. We were making a long form art video for the NYC-based arts organization Rhizome. The artwork was about exploring the ways that technology mediates our lives as a generation comes of age watching reality television and using social media. It seemed like what is considered to be performance has shifted and "acting" was losing ground as a popular medium. Video technology enables us to turn the content of our lives into a kind of show. If you grew up watching reality TV, there are so many representations of young people performing their own identity as if they are characters. We even spent a few months shooting at the New York Reality TV School, where you can be trained to become a reality star. Read More

WHERE DO WE GO NOW? DIRECTOR NADINE LABAKI'A Growing up in Lebanon as a little girl, my childhood was synchronized between home and shelter. Living in a country adorned in politics, secular perturbations, and injustice, our lives evolved around continuous wars. Most of our days were spent in confinement behind sacks of sand. There were times when it was too dangerous to even leave our homes. We couldn't go to school, we couldn't go outside to play, and we couldn't practice what normal childhood was. Early on, I started developing a unique relationship with the TV screen. Read More

IN THIS NEWSLETTER
Simon Killer
Safety Not Guaranteed
Young and Wild
Me @ the Zoo
Where Do We Go Now?
Video: Ira Glass on the Strange Life of the Producer
The Future Normal of "New Frontiers"
Sundance Day One Photo Stream
Slamdance: Welcome to Pine Hill
SUNDANCE BLOG & FEATURES
News, columns, and opinions straight from Park City
VIDEO: IRA GLASS ON THE STRANGE LIFE OF THE PRODUCER By Scott Macaulay

When Mike Birbiglia asked This American Life's Ira Glass to produce his first feature, Sleepwalk with Me, premiering here at Sundance, Glass thought it sounded like it might be fun. "I'd read a couple of scripts, look at a couple of rough cuts," he remembers thinking. Glass's presumption was far from the truth... very far. In this short interview, shot before Sundance while Glass was in the sound studio with Birbiglia, he ponders -- hilariously -- the job of the producer.Watch

THE FUTURE NORMAL OF "NEW FRONTIERS" By Alicia Van Couvering

Now in its sixth year, the New Frontiers section at Sundance premiered yesterday at its new home at The Yard, in an unassuming building across from a snow-cloaked cemetery. Presenting the year's crop of new media, transmedia and experiential video art to a room of press, Sundance programmer Shari Frilot explained her curatorial criteria, though not before a number of the pieces had to turn off their sound (a booming heart beat coming through the wall of Ho Tzu Nyen's The Cloud of Unknowing on her left, the Wagnerian glory coming from Marco Brambilla's Evolution (Megaplex) to her right.) "What will resonate and expand film culture?" Read More

SUNDANCE DAY 1 PHOTO STREAM By Alexandra Byer

Filly Brown director Youssef Delara and his wife agreed to have their photo taken by me in the shuttle from Salt Lake to Park City... even after they had been traveling for the last 24-hours. They were complete champs and Youssef didn't even seem all that tired. He kept up with all my annoying questions, and was excited and eager for Filly Brown's premiere today. Read More
First-hand accounts by filmmakers

WELCOME TO PINE HILL: THE BREAKOUT HIT OF SLAMDANCE 2012 By Keith Miller

Or What we're doing to get people to see our movie in Park City
"What do you want out of this film?" That's been one of the first things people ask when starting to talk about Welcome to Pine Hill. If they really like it, they ask, "What's your festival strategy?" Since Pine Hill was not the product of years of planning or a business model, the answer to the questions was easy: I wanted to finish the film; my festival strategy was to get into a festival. The movie came directly out of real life events and even though I may want to, I don't have as much of a strategy for real life and what I want isn't always in 'reality's' plans.Read more


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